How to Find Technical Writing Jobs On Twitter

Looking for a Technical Writing job? I’ve started to use Twitter to find leads and other opportunities to develop my career as a technical writer. To use Twitter to find jobs, you need to understand how it works, how to connect, and how to lead prospects from your twitter stream back to your technical writing website.

Technical Writing Jobs On Twitter: Where to Start

Where most technical writers go wrong is that they don’t use Twitter as effectively as possible. That’s not a direct criticism of anyone, it’s just that to use Twitter for strategic purposes, you need to examine how it works and develop a Twitter Plan that supports your recruitment strategy.

To do this:

  • Twitter Bio – add the terms technical writing, technical writer, technical communication or variations of these to your Bio.
  • Website – link back to your technical writing website and/or the Hire Me page. You have a Hire Me page on your blog, right?
  • Follow Strategically – Search Twitter for other technical writers and follow them. Delete spam followers. Keep your account as focused on technical writing / tech comms as possible.

Technical Writing Jobs: How Twitter Works

Next:

  • Engage with others.
  • Create lists, such as my technical writing list, and use this to track technical writers on twitter.
  • Create a column in Hootsuite (or Tweetdeck) and follow all tweets with TechComms in them. Use the hashtag to find this.
  • Use search.twitter.com to find people with questions about technical writing.
  • Share useful information, such as retweets, conference dates,
  • Link to other technical writing blogs you recommend AND
  • Help others.

Always look for ways to help others. Not only is this good Social Media karma, but a great way to position yourself as an Authority.

Technical Writing Jobs: How to Find Work

It all comes down to Authority.

You have to be the ‘default’ resource people go to when they have an issue with something specific.

For example:

In other words, these folks (for me) at the people I look towards when I want information on these specific topics.

Your job is to identify a specific sub-set of technical communications and then be the authority.

Remember, it has to be a sub-set.

Technical Communications is too broad. Choose something specific, e.g. FrameMaker template development and own this.

Why?

People pay good money for someone who can help migrate Microsoft Word documents to Frame or some other conversion headache they may have.

Technical Writing Jobs: How to Advertise Your Skills

Like I said, you need to be the Authority and then only way to do this is to make your site reflect it. Examine your site.

  • Does it demonstrate your expertise in this area?
  • How could you demonstrate your expertise? For example, samples, tutorials, information graphics.
  • Share free information, such as slides, presentations, templates, and other downloads.

Design you technical writing site so that others bookmark it, share it with others, and keep coming back.

Conclusion

You can find work on Twitter if you understand how it works and then link it back to your homebase, i.e. your blog. Make sure to be consistent and offer useful information that helps others.

Others will begin to contact you with questions and, after you make stronger connections, recommend you to others. And once you have recommendations, the job offers will begin to come in.

That’s how I use Twitter to find work. How about you?

PS – I’ve written a very detailed article on how to create a marketing plan for twitter which explains how I use twitter in more depth. It’s not just about marketing but how to position yourself as an authority.

Download these templates to start

Acceptance Test Plan

Contingency Plan

Software Development Templates

Acquisition Plan

Conversion Plan

Software Requirements Specification

Action Plan

Cost Benefit Analysis

Software Testing

API Documentation

Database Design

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

Audience Analysis

Datasheet

Statement of Work

Availability Plan

Deployment Plan

System Administration Guide

Bill of Materials

Design Document

System Boundary

Business Case

Disaster Recovery Plan

System Design Document

Business Continuity

Disposition Plan

System Specifications

Business Plan

Documentation Plan

Technical Writing Templates

Business Process

Employee Handbook

Test Plan

Business Requirements

Error Message Guide

Training Plan

Business Rules

Expression of Interest

Transition Plan

Capacity Plan

Fact Sheet

Troubleshooting Guide

Case Study

Feasibility Study

Use Case

Change Management Plan

Functional Requirements

User Guide

Communication Plan

Grant Proposal

Verification and Validation Plan

Concept of Operations

Implementation Plan

White Papers

Concept Proposal

Installation Plan

Work Instructions

Configuration Management Plan

Interface Control Document

Software Development Templates

Acceptance Test Plan

Maintenance Plan

Software Requirements Specification

Acquisition Plan

Market Research

Software Testing

Action Plan

Marketing Plan

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

API Documentation

Needs Statement

Statement of Work

Audience Analysis

Operations Guide

System Administration Guide

Availability Plan

Policy Manual

System Boundary

Bill of Materials

Project Plan

System Design Document

Business Case

Proposal Manager Templates

System Specifications

Business Continuity

Proposal Template

Technical Writing Templates

Business Plan

Quality Assurance Plan

Test Plan

Business Process

Release Notes

Training Plan

Business Requirements

Request for Proposal

Transition Plan

Business Rules

Risk Management Plan

Troubleshooting Guide

Capacity Plan

Scope of Work

Use Case

Case Study

Security Plan

User Guide

Change Management Plan

Service Level Agreement (SLA)

Verification and Validation Plan

Communication Plan

Setup Guide

White Papers

Concept of Operations

Social Media Policy

Work Instructions

Concept Proposal

Contingency Plan

 

Configuration Management Plan

Conversion Plan